Hound Point

Pamela and I met for some local bouldering at Hound Point on Friday. It’s not extensive, but with a bit of imagination can provide some fun problems in a pleasant setting. The landings on the main area are generally flat and sandy, but it’s worth having something to get the sand off your shoes before starting a problem. Unfortunately, it’s also worth watching out for broken glass on holds and particularly the top. Wilf.

Pamela bouldering at Hound Point.
Me making a long reach.

Not a bad view.

Hound Point


Nice bouldering session yesterday at Hound Point (Dalmeny Estate). Although not extensive, with a little imagination some good problems Can be found.

Salisbury Crags Bouldering

Euan, Ivor and I had a few hours bouldering at Salisbury Crags in Edinburgh today. Temperatures were cool, but the rock was dry.

Euan on The Black Wall Traverse, Salisbury Crags.

Dovehole Boulders

Ivor, Martin and I were bouldering today in Northumberland. We visited Dovehole Boulders. It is at least fifteen years since I have been here. It was nice to return to this beautiful venue.

The venue is much greener than when I was there last. There is however still plenty to do. it is worth taking a toothbrush for the holds if you visit.

Dovehole is made up of free standing boulders.

Medonnet

Today I went for a boulder at Medonnet which is located near Combloux. This excellent venue provides a superb alternative to the Col du Montets and is significantly quieter. The rock is good quality but pretty tough on the hands after a few weeks in gloves.

Details on the approach can be found on UKC. I think it is easier to find when approached from Combloux rather than Sallanches.

Dumbarton Rock

Yesterday, Euan, Ivor and I had a very enjoyable day bouldering and sport climbing at Dumbarton Rock.

Ivor bouldering on Right Edge on The Warm Up Boulder.

There were showers around in lots of Scotland yesterday, but Dumbarton avoided most of them and the rock dried very quickly in the strong breeze.

Rhum

Jen and I have been on the Island of Rhum for the last few days. After arriving and settling in to the hostel in Kinloch Castle we went for an afternoon wander up Mullach Mor, which proved to be very rough pathless terrain with lots of tussocks, but gave great views of the island and across to Skye.

The accomodation - Kinloch Castle

The accomodation – Kinloch Castle

A late start the next day allowed us to traverse the Rhum Cuillin over two days with a bivvy high on Trallval. The bivvy was planned to let us hear the 1000s of Manx Shearwaters returning to their burrows after dark. This was an amazing experience with the bulk of the bird’s noisy activity seeming to be around midnight. The ridge gave an excellent walk with easy scrambling or more difficult options if desired, the final descent down from Sgurr nan Gillean is steep and a cup of tea in the well mainatined Dibidil bothy was most welcome.

Jen on Ainshval with Askival and Hallival behind

Jen on Ainshval with Askival and Hallival behind

On Tuesday we headed west via good tracks and stalker’s paths and walked up the granite hills of Orval and Ard Nev, which give great views of the Rhum Cuillin. A representative of the Lochaber Geo Park gave a very good, free and well attended talk on the geology of Rhum in the evening.

View from the bivvy site on Tallval with the Skye Cuillin in the distance

View from the bivvy site on Tallval with the Skye Cuillin in the distance

Our final day saw us out to the beautiful beaches of Kilmory and Samhnan Insir for some attempted swimming and excellent bouldering/short solos on the Torridonian sandstone in an idyllic setting with great views to Skye. A quick walk back to Kinloch allowed time for one last tasty cake in the Community Hall tea shop before catching the ferry back to Mallaig.

Bouldering at Samhnan Insir

Bouldering at Samhnan Insir