A Report from the East and West

I have been out the mountains the last three days. On Tuesday Laura, Euan and I visited Cha-no in the Cairngorms. Conditions were excellent on Anvil Gully and Short Ridge. Some windslab was building in Recovery Gully.

We visited Lurchers Crag on Wednesday. The top of South Gully looked fairly loaded on one side we abseiled into Quinn and climbed back out. The conditions were not as good as on Cha-no. The turf was perfect on Cha-no but suspect on Lurchers.

Laura and Euan at the top of Lurchers.

Laura and Euan at the top of Lurchers.

Today the Falkirk High Tops Team and I were at the Cobbler where we climbed Chockstone Gully and Great Gully. Conditions on Chockstone Gully were Good. Great Gully is currently much harder than the guidebook grade.

The turf on the Cobbler is not frozen apart from where exposed to the wind.

Paul climbing in Great Gully.

Paul climbing in Great Gully.

Lots more photos on the facebook page.

Luss Hills

Mick and I were out in the Luss Hills near Loch Lomond yesterday. We did a pleasant half day circuit taking in Beinn Dubh and Mid Hill.

Mick on the summit with The Cobbler, Beinn Ime and Beinn Narnain behind.

Mick on the summit with The Cobbler, Beinn Ime and Beinn Narnain behind.

This avoided the worst of the weather further North and East and gave great views. There was a cold northerly wind, it was below freezing on the summit and we had a few graupel showers during the day as well as patches of sunshine.

Chockstone Gully and Great Gully

We had good conditions on The Cobbler today where we climbed Chockstone Gully and Great Gully. There was lots of useful snow and some ice around. The turf was mostly usable.

The buttresses were all very white. Areas of poorly bonded windslab existed in some locations.

Glenn on the crux section of Great Gully.

Glenn on the crux section of Great Gully.

The Cobbler

Getting winter conditions right on The Cobbler is never easy. Hard frosts to freeze the turf; enough scouring to expose the turf on the steep sections and cloud to stop the sun stripping the rime from the South facing crags are all required. Today Mac, Steve and I were lucky enough to get it right. The walk in was tough with trenches from the weekend being mostly filled in and a lot of breakable crust to deal with; 2hrs via the back route to the col.

Mac on the bottom section of Ramshead Ridge

Mac on the bottom section of Ramshead Ridge

We climbed Ramshead Ridge and then the variation to Right Angled-Gully Direct which involves the ledge traverse to keep the grade consistent. Like most winter routes on The Cobbler it was good value and we split it in to 4 pitches to avoid rope drag. The crux on the day was the steep corner on Ramshead Ridge, which gave excellent hard technical climbing with just enough ice on the left wall to help with balance. However, gaining the groove at the end of the ledge traverse was harder than it looked and involved a fair bit of hilarity.

Mac and if you look carefully Steve leopard crawling off the ledge

Mac and if you look carefully Steve leopard crawling off the ledge

There’s wind slab on lots of aspects and careful route choice is required. The crags were well rimed and the turf on the route was very well frozen. Lot’s of ice forming above 700m on the rock steps near the Northern approach route. Powdery snow on ledges with older crusty snow underneath. Shallower angled routes and snowy gullies wouldn’t be a good choice at the moment on The Cobbler.

The South Peak of The Cobbler

The South Peak of The Cobbler

Traverse of The Cobbler

Yesterday, I was out on The Cobbler in the Arrochar Alps with the Falkirk High Tops Team. We completed the traverse of the South Peak and the Centre Peak which gives some nice moderate rock climbing and one abseil.

The abseil tat at the top of the South Peak had vanished so I replaced it. Hopefully it will remain where it is!

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Return to The Cobbler

Percy leading Great Gully.

Percy leading Great Gully.

I returned to The Cobbler today with a team to look at a number of skills including; short roping, approaching routes and guiding in series. We climbed Chockstone Gully and Great Gully.

Chockstone Gully was in good condition. However, a large area of windslab was building at the exit which will require care. This has occurred due to cross loading due in the current wind direction.

Great Gully was in good condition.

The routes we climbed did not rely on frozen turf. Any turf we came upon did not appear to be frozen.

Climbing on The Cobbler

Graham at the foot of Great Gully as Tam begins the squeeze underneath the giant chockstone.

Graham at the foot of Great Gully as Tam begins the squeeze underneath the giant chockstone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The forecast today was for very wild weather in the West Highlands. Despite this, The Falkirk High Tops Team (Graham, Tam, John, Gayle and Iona) and I had a great day out on The Cobbler in the Arrochar Alps.

We chose this venue for two reasons. Firstly, the mountain is a bit lower and receives less snow than other areas such as Glencoe. Secondly, as many of the routes face south the forecast wind should have scoured the face to leave good conditions.

Our plan paid off. We first climbed Chockstone Gully. There is some soft slab gathering in the initial pitches due to cross loading but we managed to avoid moving on this. The wall that is used to pass underneath the giant chockstone had good snow on it.

The slope between the top of Chockstone Gully and the base of Great Gully which was our second route of the day had been blasted by the wind leaving only old hard snow on it. Great Gully was in excellent condition with good hard snow, useful neve on the crux bulge and frozen turf at the exit.

There was areas of windslab forming on similar aspects to that suggested by the Glencoe avalanche forecast and also on southerly aspects due to cross loading.

Tam exiting Chockstone Gully. The giant chockstone which forms the arch is just behind.

Tam exiting Chockstone Gully. The giant chockstone which forms the arch is just behind.

 

The Cobbler Traverse

The Falkirk High Tops Team and I were out today in the Arrochar Alps near Loch Lomond. We climbed the South East Ridge of the South Summit of The Cobbler (Moderate) before abseiling to the col after a very brief stop on top. Some of the team continued to the Central Summit while others returned to the valley.

It is worth noting that all the abseil tat required to descend from the South Summit in anything but perfect conditions has vanished! We have put a new length of 10 mm rope through the thread anchor which will hopefully remain in place.

The weather was very challenging today but all members of the team did a great job in the conditions.

Part way up the South East Ridge of The Cobbler.

Part way up the South East Ridge of The Cobbler.

The Cobbler

Pamela and I headed to The Cobbler today and climbed Maclay’s Crack. This gave a good climb up a natural winter line on very well frozen turf and rimed rock.

Pamela leading the 1st pitch of Maclay’s Crack

There’d been some fresh snow and some wind movement of snow since Sunday and no significant consolidation of the snowpack. However, the approach to the crag was fine and deeper unconsolidated areas were generally avoidable. The turf at crag height is well frozen, there’s some icing, but burns are still running. Cloud cover all day with just the odd lifting of the cloud above the summits. Light South-easterly winds.

The South Face of The North Peak of The Cobbler

More Cobbler Photos

On the basis that a picture paints a thousand words here are a few more photos from yesterday on the Cobbler kindly sent through by Nettle.

Starting the crux wall on The South-East Ridge

The Arete of The Centre Peak from The South Peak

Near the start of the 2nd pitch of The Arete

The summit block of the Cobbler (note ropes emerging from the Doorway)